15 SG Coworking Spaces Under S$300 For 10 Days/Month

One-third of coworking spaces overall don’t offer any options for plans for under 20 days per month. It’s full-time or bust for them.

However, nearly half of the spaces that we’ve seen have plans for 7-10 days/month and cost less than S$300. There are over a dozen options in that price range and here are 15 of them sorted by geography.

CBD

Collective Works

Collective Works’ locations at Cecil Street and Robinson Road are at the epicenter of business in Singapore. Smartly furnished, colourful yet business-friendly. The space is well-lit by natural sunlight. Use it as a base for meeting marathons with companies based in the CBD. Regular networking events are also a draw.

 

JustCo

JustCo is also a premium space, with locations at One Raffles Quay and Robinson Road. The decor is hipster-chic, fresh yet soothing with neutral wood and stone hues. Obligatory caveats about neon-lit wall sayings apply. Community events run the gamut from networking drinks to yoga.

 

WOTSO

WOTSO has the most centrally located rooftop terrace of any coworking space in Singapore. Their location at Cecil street is a tidy green lung in the CBD. The neighbourhood simply feels calmer. Regular work spaces are supplemented by high tables, lawn furniture, and a London phone booth replica for private calls. There’s an antipodean Aussie atmosphere as well thanks to WOTSO’s Australian brand recognition.

 

Clarke Quay / Boat Quay

Space Co Group

Space Co at Boat Quay is indisputably the coworking space closest to the Singapore River. It’s Peranakan-style latticework windows permit sounds of the bustle below, while air-conditioning on the opposite wall keeps things comfy. Smaller than most, and colourful to boot, it has a rustic and strongly local vibe that is strikingly different from most other spaces.

 

Tribe by TEC

Also in Boat Quay, but facing away from the river, on the comparatively quiet Circular Road is Tribe by TEC. In an unassuming shophouse lies one of the most eclectic spaces in Singapore. Composite wood cars and enormous dreamcatchers reside along industrial sliding grille doors and chairs straight out of a Herman Miller catalogue. There is no shortage of inspiration here.

 

Space Works

Grey, brown and grass green accents imbue this space with an organic calm. Occupying the ground floor of a busy stretch on North Bridge Road is Space Works. Though the space is far from cheap, the layout, awareness of space and attention to detail illuminate the hand of masterful office planning.

 

Collision8

Occupying the prime spot astride both Clarke Quay and Boat Quay is Collision8 in the unassuming High Street Centre on North Bridge Road. It is one of the most handsomely appointed spaces anywhere in the entire region. Every floor-to-ceiling window on 2 sides are lined with generously spaced work desks with their own lamps. Small niches for meetings abound, and the common area is furnished with stately rich leather sofas.

 

The Hive Singapore

The Hive’s Clark Quay location is the latest addition to their network of spaces from Hong Kong to Bangkok. The space is situated opposite to The Central at Clarke Quay, and has a slew of regular events that consciously avoid networking, offering film screenings and small concerts. The syncretic fusion of work and play at The Hive is unexpectedly coherent. The antidote to corporatisation of startup culture.

Orchard / Dhoby Ghaut

The Hub Singapore

The Hub is one of the pioneers of coworking space in Singapore. As such, their tenants range from tech companies on the cusp of a NASDAQ IPO to locally grown concerns. Their community is also strong, with frequent, well-attended events both public and private. Cuppage Plaza in Orchard and Prinsep Street near Bugis are their locations.

 

Big Work

Big Work has the stylings of a modern academic institution with its numerous tables low and high, group discussion spaces and sofas. There’s also a Huggs cafe to boot. Local business school ERC is the owner of this contemporary space, which offers complimentary gym membership. It’s proximity to Bras Basah and Bugis MRT stations helps it’s accessibility.

 

Work Central

Far across the road from Dhoby Ghaut’s Plaza Singapura is the Singapore Shopping Center, a quiet building concealing a buzzing space within. Spacious, colourful with splashes of purple and yellow, Work Central makes full use of the advantages offered by an off-prime location to offer a beautiful space for attractive prices.

 

Spacemob

Tucked in Claymore Hill, a serene corner of Orchard is Spacemob, offering a modern, essential coworking experience. What is lacking in finesse is made up for in value. Prices are competitive and perks such as showers, free coffee as well as community events are available.

Outram Park / Tanjong Pagar

The Working Capitol

The neighbourhood around The Working Capitol is classic hipster-cool. There are local restaurants decades-old nestling alongside molecular gastronomy joints, all anchored by the Working Capitol on the corner of Keong Saik road. The space is well-lit by natural light and has ample shared activities and spaces, including a one-of-a-kind communal lunch. Pricy but you can see where the value is.

 

Lavender / Kallang

Cowerkz

With locations at Jalan Besar (Lavender MRT) and Geylang, Cowerkz is in the gritty, authentic heart of Singapore hipsterdom, surrounded equally by chic cafes and noodle stalls from the 1950’s. Surprisingly, Cowerkz has a functional, almost spartan approach to decor. Spaces are well-lit and furnished with sturdy recliners, but without extravagance.

Kent Ridge

Spacemob

Adjacent to the National University of Singapore is Science Park Drive, a sleepy enclave of engineering and technology companies. It is not your usual location for a coworking space, but then neither is Spacemob. For a substantially lower price, Spacemob offers a modern, essential coworking experience. Perks such as showers, free coffee as well as community events are not commonly available for a low price. Location will be the drawback for most.

cover photo by JUJUlianar on Flickr

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *